The Velocity Fund

The Velocity Fund awards grants to 12 Philadelphia-based art projects in its 3rd year of re-granting

For 2020, The Velocity Fund is proud to announce the results of its third year of re-granting. Twelve new art projects—conceived by Philadelphia artists—will be awarded $5,000 each.

The 2020 Velocity Fund grantees are:

  • Yaroub Alobaidi – Al Mudhif The Traditional Reed Guest House
  • Nia Benjamin/Ninth Planet – Honey Honey Community Film Project
  • Diente Fo – Gente De Tierra
  • Annielille Gavino – De(scribing) Filipinx
  • Cecilia Gonzalez Barragan – Alumbra: Placemaking Through Light
  • John Jarboe/The Bearded Ladies Cabaret Company – Late Night Snacks Take Out Cabaret
  • Daiyon Kpou – JUICE Visual Art Exhibition and Film Showcase
  • Pedro Ospina – Reaffirming, Reviving and Reinventing
  • Melissa B. Skolnick-Noguera/Timbalona – Rumba en Filadelfia
  • Kristal Sotomayor – Expanding Sanctuary
  • Lendl Tellington – Philly 76′
  • Rashid Zakat – Hold it Down

You can read more about the projects here.

Applications were reviewed by a distinguished panel of arts administrators, curators and artists: Karen Patterson, Curator at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM); Deidre McPherson, Department Director of Public Programs at The Cleveland Museum of Art; Peter Nesbett, Keeper of Imaginative Futures (aka Executive Director) of Washington Project for the Arts; and Raúl Romero, Philadelphia-based artist and 2019 Velocity Fund Grantee.

This year’s grantees proposed a wide range of projects including portable cabarets, audio visual publications, light installations, collaborative sculpture, documentaries and exhibitions—each focused on connection with communities throughout Philadelphia. Many of these dynamic projects envision new forms of outreach during the pandemic. As panelist Peter Nesbett said: 

“The pluck and resilience of Philadelphia’s independent cultural producers is inspiring, especially in our current moment. As for the projects we reviewed, many struck me as perpetuating a rich dialogue amongst the normally distinct realms of art, heritage, and folklore. I am excited to see the projects we were able to fund come to fruition.”

Karen Patterson also noticed a theme emerging in the pool of 77 applications for this year’s funding:

“I was struck by the common thread running through the applicants this year. There was an urgent request to move more voices, more ways of seeing the world, into the spotlight. And not just a traditional spotlight of museums or institutions, but into communities, parks, and homes. It is my hope that these requests, these applications, signal a commitment to the creative process as a means of connecting people to their surroundings and to the world at large.”

Raúl Romero added, “I’m excited to see how the Velocity Fund will help amplify the many voices of these artists that are so vital to be heard during these times!” 

Due to continued health guidance prohibiting large gatherings, we will not be holding a public reception to celebrate the 2020 Velocity Fund grantees at this time. 

 

COVID-19 Artist Emergency Relief Grants applications still open.

Artists who need financial relief can apply now—the application is short and simple.

The first drawing was Monday, April 27, 2020; subsequent rounds were held on June 17, August 31, and November 30, 2020.

We have secured funding for an additional round of funding in Spring 2021.

Please read the COVID-19 Artist Emergency Relief Grants FAQ page for further details on eligibility, the application process, and grant distribution.

 

Added Velocity—in its Inaugural Year—Announces Grant to Support Five Philadelphia-based Art Projects

Added Velocity will fund five ambitious projects led by Philadelphia-based artists $15,000 (each) to build on the successes of their initial Velocity Fund initiatives. Added Velocity—which is administered by Temple Contemporary at the Tyler School of Art and Architecture with generous support from the William Penn Foundation—builds on the momentum of The Velocity Fund by directly supporting successful previous grantees who demonstrate a commitment to expanding their initial projects in meaningful and far-reaching ways in Philadelphia.

Each of applicants were 2018 Velocity Fund grantees – initially selected from a pool of over 120 proposals. 


The 2019 Added Velocity grantees are:
APIARY Magazine (Steven Burns*) 
Black Quantum Futurism (Rasheedah Phillips*) 
Creative Resilient Youth (CRY) (Andrea Ngan*) 
Reentry Think Tank: Reentry Bill of Rights’, (Mark Strandquist*) 
Speak Speak, Walk Walk… Listen (Amy Hicks*)
(*denotes lead organizer of the project)

Applications were reviewed by a distinguished panel of arts administrators and curators: Courtney Fink, co-founder and executive director of Common Field; Margot Norton, curator at the New Museum in New York City; and Philadelphia-based independent curator Blake Bradford.  This same panel met in 2018 to decide the initial grants, so this process presents a unique opportunity to revisit the outcome of prior funding.  This year’s grantees proposed a wide range of projects –from walking tours to speculative time portals, magazines to youth-led projects– each with the goal of deepening impact within Philadelphia communities through the creative intervention.

Rob Blackson, director of exhibitions and public programs, Temple Contemporary, Tyler School of Art and Architecture, says of the process: “This year’s inaugural Added Velocity grantees are a testament to the necessity of connecting artists with communities throughout Philadelphia. I am so excited to see how each of these creative initiatives will continue to grow thanks to the Velocity Fund and support from the William Penn Foundation and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.”  

You can read more about the 2019 Added Velocity projects here.

 

The Velocity Fund awards grants to 14 Philadelphia-based art projects for its second year of re-granting

The Velocity Fund, an Andy Warhol Foundation Regional Regranting Program, administered by Temple Contemporary at the Tyler School of Art and Architecture, directly supports visual artists living in the city of Philadelphia. In The Velocity Fund’s second year of re-granting, fourteen new art projects conceived by Philadelphia artists have been awarded $5,000 each, after being selected from a pool of 118 applicants. This year’s grantees proposed a wide range of projects from research, publications, critical writing and zines, to crafts, workshops and installations.

The 2019 Velocity Fund grantees:
  • Arielle Brown* – Black Spatial Relics
  • Ryan Collerd* – A Polymath’s Sphere (working title)
  • Lillian Dunn* – The Medicine Grows Close to the Wound
  • Erica Faria* – Phonebook: The Gold Pages
  • Elissa Fredeen* – Sound Museum Collective
  • Maddie Hewitt* – Confluence
  • Nadia Hironaka* –Las Ruinas Circulares
  • Heather Holmes* – Conflicts of Interest
  • Sterling Johnson* – War on People
  • Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela* – No Otro Lado Music Video Series
  • Jonathan Olshefski* – Whispers in the Storm
  • Raúl Romero* – Onomonopoetics of a Puerto Rican Landscape
  • Robin Turnage* –Pottery Workshops
  • Connie Yu* – FORTUNE in the Year of the Rat

* Lead organizer of the project

Applications were reviewed by a distinguished panel of arts administrators, curators and artists: Roya Amirsoleymani, Artistic Director and Curator of Public Engagement at the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art; Meg Onli, Assistant Curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania; Laura Phipps, Assistant Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art; and Karina Puente, Philadelphia-based artist and 2018 Velocity Fund Grantee.

The public is invited to celebrate The Velocity Fund grantees at an award ceremony on Monday, September 16th at 6 p.m. at the Cherry Street Pier, 121 N Christopher Columbus Blvd.

Velocity Fund awards inaugural grants to 14 Philadelphia-based art projects

The Velocity Fund, a new program created by Temple Contemporary at the Tyler School of Art to directly support visual artists living in the city of Philadelphia, has announced its inaugural grant winners. Fourteen new art projects conceived by Philadelphia artists—most of them proposing to work collaboratively—were selected from more than 120 applicants to receive awards of up to $5,000.

Download Press Release

The 2018 Velocity Fund Grantees:
  • Aislinn Pentecost-Farren* and Corey Chao – Quarantine Play
  • Amy Hicks*, Talia Greene, Michael Konrad, Maggie Mills, Jed Morfit, Ephraim Russell and Marianna Williams (GrizzyGrizzly) – Speak Speak Blog and Publication
  • Andrea Ngan*, Michelle Delgado, Elizabeth Weinstein and Bennett Kuhn (Creative Resilience Collective) –
  • Brooke O’Harra* and Sharon Hayes – Time Passes
  • Davelle Barnes* – The Black Veterans Art Conference
  • Karina Puente* and Yolanda Wisher – #SisterlyHistory
  • Mark Strandquist* and Courtney Bowles – The Reentry Think Tank
  • Martha O’Connell * (Amber Art & Design) – Strawberry Mansion Up Close
  • Strategic Communications Group
  • Rasheedah Phillips* and Camae Ayewa (Black Quantum Futurism) – Black Womxn Temporal Portal
  • Sarah Mueller* (cinéSPEAK) – The cinéSPEAK Youth Crew
  • Steve Burns*, Alexa Smith, Warren Longmire, Kai Davis, Kareem Groomes and Miriam Harris (APIARY Magazine) – APIARY X
  • Timothy Belknap* and Taji Ra’oof Nahl, a.k.a. TR7 – Drape and Cladding
  • Yvonne Lung* and Dave Kyu – Dish – the Mealkit

* Lead organizer of the project

Established with the support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Velocity Fund is one of 12 Regional Regranting programs launched by the foundation to fund “under-the-radar artistic activity” by partnering with leading cultural institutions in cities across the nation where the level of self-organized artistic activity is the highest. The Velocity Fund is the first Warhol Foundation-supported regional re-granting program in Pennsylvania, and only the second on the East Coast between Maine and Florida.

Applications were reviewed by a distinguished panel of arts administrators and curators: Courtney Fink, co-founder and executive director of Common Field; Margot Norton, curator at the New Museum in New York City; and Philadelphia-based independent curator Blake Bradford.

“The decision-making process was a difficult one for our panelists, with so many fantastic and and diverse projects vying for a limited number of grants,” said Robert Blackson, director of Temple Contemporary. “The quantity of applications and the quality of the artists seeking funding proved that Philadelphia has an extraordinarily rich and vibrant artistic community. It also demonstrated the urgent need for direct funding for artists—especially at a time when federal funding for artists has declined sharply. I can’t wait to see what these artists create.”

Blackson noted that the grantees represent the types of artists that the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts’ Regional Regranting programs most seek to reach: professional visual artists working in informal, non-incorporated collectives on projects with the broadest possible range of public outcomes, including websites, books, performances, screenings and more.

The public is invited to celebrate the inaugural class of Velocity Fund grantees at a ceremony on September 11 at 6 p.m. at Temple Contemporary in the Tyler School of Art at Temple University’s Main Campus (2001 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19118).

More about Temple Contemporary

Temple Contemporary creatively re-imagines the social function of art. This mission is guided by a 35-member advisory council representing a broad spectrum of Philadelphia residents, including high-school students of color in our North Philadelphia neighborhood, faculty and students at Temple University and civic leaders such as nurses, public historians and block captains. Collaborating with these advisors has centered our position of creative public service and has necessitated a fundamental philosophical shift for the organization to recognize social engagement as the determining factor of our programming. This shift necessitates a foregrounding of curatorial accountability, reciprocity and exchange that forms the basis of Temple Contemporary’s social life and, by extension, our values. Our recent work has included Funeral for a Home, Symphony for a Broken Orchestra and coming this fall, 1000 Ways to Listen.